Get Rid of Huge Files in Gmail

If you are pushing the limits of your allotted Gmail disc space, here is a handy widget that can make finding those huge emails easy. Find Big Email is a simple web based widget for Gmail to help you get rid of those 3 year old emails with EPS attachments that are collecting digital dust.

Basically, you just submit your Gmail address to the site and Find Big Email does a one time scan of your Gmail account email account. From a security POV, it doesn’t ask you for your password. I don’t know the technical way it is able to scan your Gmail account, but I have not had any issues. More details on security questions related to the service can be found here and here.

Anyway, the one time scan then creates a set of labels based on the different file sizes of your emails and it creates some custom labels (Biggest, > 2MB, > 500kb, > 100kb) using Gmail’s advanced label/search functions that then populate your label list. Go to those labels and all the emails that meet those size criteria are listed right there for you to see. From there, delete away and clear out your digital email attic. The nice thing is that if you ever start to encroach on your disc space limitation sometime in the future, just click on one of these labels (“Biggest” emails or emails over 2MB) and all of those emails will be there to pick off and delete.

Who The Hell Is Ken Dahlberg?

Tricky Dick

Overshadowed by the passing of Steve Jobs, Kenneth Dahlberg also died on Tuesday October 4th.

“Who the hell is Ken Dahlberg?” President Richard M. Nixon asked on June 23, 1972, his voice captured on tape in the Oval Office. He would find out soon enough. Without Kenneth H. Dahlberg, Nixon might not have become ensnared in the Watergate scandal and been forced to resign.

Mr. Dahlberg, who died on Tuesday (October 4, 2011) at 94, became the unwitting link between the Nixon re-election campaign and the five men who, only days before Nixon’s remark, were charged with breaking into the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex in Washington.

He had been a fund-raiser for Nixon’s re-election campaign, and his name was on a $25,000 cashier’s check that had been deposited in the bank account of one of the burglars, Bernard L. Barker. The money was to help cover the burglars’ expenses, and Mr. Barker had withdrawn that amount in $100 bills. He was carrying more than $5,000 when he was arrested on June 17 (1972).

If Woodward & Bernstein don’t uncover the connection between Dahlberg and the Committee to Re-Elect The President (Nixon), the whole Watergate connection between Nixon and Watergate may not have been made. Or, it would have been exceedingly harder to uncover the connection.

As Deep Throat said, “Follow the money”.

I’ve said it several times, but to me, the unraveling of the Watergate scandal is still one of the most fascinating stories in history.

via The NY Times

The Human Scale of Apple Stores

Apple Store – 5th Ave., NYC

Really interesting and insightful article about the architects that have designed many of the Apple stores around the world, and their relationship with Steve Jobs.

I remember when Steve first hired us, he said: “I hired you because you’ve done very good large buildings, and you’ve done great houses.” If you’re doing houses, then you’re thinking about the subtleties of a building.”

As is legend now, Jobs’ laser focus on the user experience within Apple’s products also extended all the way to the retail experience, to the point where Jobs perceived retail as simply an extension of the overall Apple product line.

via NY Times

Taken For A Ride

A couple of guys in Princeton, NJ took a Porsche Panamera for a test drive around central NJ, pulled a switch-a-roo with its “key“, and then stopped by the dealership after hours and took the $148K car for good:

The dealer, who accompanied the men during the test drive, noticed the car was missing upon opening shop the next morning. How could this have happened to such an expensive car with such a (presumably) expensive security system? Simple: the car features a keyless ignition system, with no physical key. An electronic key sits in the driver’s pocket allowing one-touch access to opening the doors and turning the car on. Sounds like a fast pass for a simple switcheroo for these techy thieves.

For all the fancy, high tech keyless entry solutions, sometimes analog keys are the best solutions.

via Time Magazine News Feed